Life has a lot of coincidences

Japanese business start-up consultant

I like to study English. My passion came from my childhood memory. My parents are Christians, and they took me to a service every Sunday where there were preachers. Some of the congregation were Japanese, but the others were from abroad. In addition, my mother has an English teaching qualification. All in all, western culture was in a natural environment for me. Although I feel fascinated by speaking English, my parents never forced me to learn English, so I didn’t speak English much when I was a child. However, I chose an English literature major at junior college, because there was a choice for me to do it. Life has a lot of coincidences, and I finally took that opportunity. I also joined the club activity, called the English Speaking Society, and learned some colloquial English.

My next biggest chance for learning English was my husband’s relocation to London in 2010. At that time, I was not interested in going to English learning institution, because everybody was speaking English in their everyday lives, so I thought there was no point in paying a high tuition fee to learn English. Instead, I found an organisation, called MRC, which provided services for migrants, including English courses. The local language is a tool to communicate with local people, and I was lucky enough to learn English there. While I was learning English, a member of staff saw me studying at the reception desk one day, and she introduced me to their legal team department where they provide a legal service for migrants. Luckily, I found work there, too.

Some of my blog readers will have come across my blog by chance, which is a coincidence, a so-called algorithm at this moment. Using algorithms is controversial, but chance is a chance. It is some sort of serendipity. In addition, I appreciate the opportunity to express my idea freely on the Internet, as there are many countries where there is no freedom of speech. I am not a person to fight to acquire rights, and I generally accept my fate and current situation. However, at the same time, I am not submissive enough, and sometimes I say what I think my opinion confidently. When some people see me expressing my opinion, they say I am snobbish and opinionated, but that is my character. If they feel like that, that is fine for me, because the reason they feel is their matter, and not mine, so I am not convinced by them, but I respect their feelings, because everybody is different. The good point is that when I realise my way of expression might seem aggressive to someone, that is a great opportunity for me to think and amend it accordingly.

I hope for an equal world, but there is no such a paradise in society. Humans are intelligent in many ways, and all of us always compare each other consciously and unconsciously. The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. However, the sort of character I don’t like is a person who takes advantage of someone else. Sometimes people behave like that without realising it, so the thing I want to emphasise is to pause at some point, and look around their situation. To do so, taking a deep breath is the most effective way, I believe. I do it quite often, but sometimes this action is taken as a sigh of tiredness and sadness, in which it might contain those emotions, because the world is unfair.

However, the most important thing is to continue doing something until you get fed up, because our life continues until our death. If you feel too much pain at the current position, you don’t need to endure the situation too much, in which people feel despair too much, as it might cause mental problem. I feel the same sometimes, but there is always a way to move forward, that is for sure. My mentor told me that when one door closes, a new door opens, and I respect it. At the same time, one sort of endurance is called tolerance, so I also respect the tolerance as well, because that is the highest result of education. According to the Cambridge dictionary, the word “tolerance” means a willingness to accept behaviour and beliefs that are different from your own, although you might not agree with or approve of them. Don’t be discouraged too much by things happening.

Last week, I wrote a blog about “Accept circumstances”, and this means the same. In these situations, people need someone who listens and gives them clear information and advice. Human beings are social creatures. I believe that a good professional should be aware of technical issues, and most importantly, emphasise with people’s feelings.

I will update every Monday.
For more information

https://lawhelp4u.com/blog/
Japanese business consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)

Akiko HORI

The way to light up our lives.

Japanese business start-up consultant

I would like to talk about children’s future. Children are the future generations and they deserve a bright future regardless of their ability, or their parents’ status and situation. However, nowadays it is difficult for them to follow their dreams unless their talent is exceptional or their family financially backs them up, because of capitalism. For example, the English Chancellor, Rishi Sunak was told he would become a prime minister by his school headmaster at the time, and his wife’s family is the sixth richest family in India. That is a massive fortune. The world has become unfair, so do others like ordinary people have to give up their challenge? No, I don’t think so, because we don’t need to achieve fame or stardom like elites or celebrities. As a human being, all of us deserve a decent and calm fulfilment.

My ethos is to empathise with other people, because we are not alone in society. When I was a child aged ten, I was bullied and felt extremely sad at that time, but when I look back at my own past, the experience was not bad at all, and still taught me a lesson of life. Especially now, I realise that the person who bullies a friend also has a problem, such as an issue in their family, mental problem and pressure. However, it is almost impossible for the bullied person to understand this because they are also still young. Adults such as parents, guardians and teachers should, therefore, realise the potential sign. However, this is also difficult, because getting older doesn’t mean all adults are mature enough. When I was child, I wanted to grow up quickly to gain freedom, but in reality as an adult, freedom is not being free at all, and always includes a responsibility instead. If so, what can we do?

Firstly, learning is important. The knowledge and comprehension that we acquire from school provide us with many of the necessary skills in a practical world. I want children to find a favourite thing from those subjects they learn from school. Traditional formal education should not be undervalued. In my experience, I didn’t study much, and the time I studied hard was just before the exams. I regret it now, so now I do study with my child aged eight. When he does his homework and uses learning materials, we work together. It doesn’t mean I answer questions instead of him, I just look at the contents and think about what is written on the paper. Basically, I can absorb basic knowledge a lot from them.

I suppose I was lucky for being a lawyer now, as to be a Shishoshoshi lawyer, I didn’t need to take a university degree, and I only took the professional exam. Nowadays, almost all lawyers and many accountants undertake full-time study at university, which costs quite a lot, before their exams, but other ways still exist. In my case, this was a professional exam. Learning never ends, so I still had to study by myself. My suggestion is that it would be worth searching for what suits us by ourselves.

Importantly, I want children to enjoy learning. Everybody is different. Even though they face some difficulties, I don’t want them to stop learning. If no one talks to you at school, why not read a book, play music or draw a picture instead. As individuals, we only have a limited time, but books, music and art tell you many different aspects of life. When I was bullied, I expressed my sad feelings on a recorder. I don’t have it anymore, but I wanted to express my emotion at that time, and funnily enough, it worked to support my mental strength.

By using the same tactics, I am now recording my voice to learn how to explain and learn vocabulary. I assume language is the power to communicate with others, because humans are social animals. That would be my own way, but there is a way for each of us, if we seek for it. Additionally, when we do something pleasant, we can lift up our feelings and that would create energy of living. Learning contributes to our education, so don’t detract from it.

I will update every Monday.
For more information https://lawhelp4u.com/blog/

Japanese business consultant
Work for Life
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

My career and business experiences

Hello. It is Akiko HORI, Shihoshoshi lawyer in Japan. Today, I would like to talk about my career and business experiences.

I started my career at the Industrial Bank of Japan after my college graduation, and was in charge of reception and secretarial work. I wrote “my career”, but in reality, it was not as such, and I did only general office administration, but I enjoyed working there, because the bank was one of the leading banks in Japan. I saw many company executives and smart people, but I felt inferior at the same time, and decided to study something. I took the Secretarial Skills Test, 1st Grade, but I still felt it was not enough.

Since then, I was thinking what kind of qualification I should have, and I realised there are so many disputes in society, and I want to avoid those troubles. In addition, in order to know how society is structured when agreements and rights enter into the practical need to acquire knowledge and to avoid problems in advance, I studied for the Shihoshoshi Lawyer qualification exam, and passed the exam in 2006 and after 1 year’s work experience at a law firm, opened own law office in 2008.

While managing my own office, I focus on building business networks, performing daily legal work and registration work. However, as an individual, I cannot cover everything, so I need help some time, and I want to offer support. My work is a referral basis, and there are other people in society. Humans are social creatures.

Things might be hard especially for non-Japanese people in Japan, because in general, in Japan, co-operation with society is most important, and individual ideas and individual happiness tend to be ignored. However, when one door closes, a new door opens. I am here to help if needed.

I will update every Monday.
For more information
Japanese business consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)

Akiko HORI

A business start-up as a sole trader

Japanese business start-up consultant

I used to work as an adviser at Tokyo One-Stop Business Establishment Center. Many foreign nationals came to seek legal advice on how to set up a company in Japan, especially in Tokyo.

 

Setting up a company is an option to do business, but working as a sole trader is another option. A sole trader is a business that is owned and run by one person. There is only one owner, but they may have employees who work for them. Sole traders are usually start-ups or small businesses. Sole traders have unlimited liability and the owner is personally responsible for the debts of the business. A sole trader pays income tax on their earnings.

 

A sole trader calculates the amount of income earned during the year from 1st January to 31st December of each year and the amount of income tax, and must file a tax application form at a tax office between 16th February and 15th March of the following year.

 

It has the risk of unlimited liability and there is a high level of responsibility for the business owner, but it is quick and easy to set up and has low set-up costs.

I hope the information is useful.

I will update every Monday.

For more information

Japanese business consultant

Shihoshoshi Lawyer

(Judicial Scrivener)

Akiko HORI

https://lawhelp4u.com/english/legal-advice-for-business-in-japan/

 

 

Thinking about a Japanese Public Holiday: Respect for the Aged Day

In Japan, today is a public holiday, and it is called “Respect for the Aged Day.” Like other developed countries, Japan has an ageing population.

 

Source: National Institute of Population and Social Security Research

 

Nowadays, many young people are fascinated by the idea to live in cities, because they can pursue something new, gorgeous and exciting to fulfill their own desire and leave the place where they were born. They try to find their own identity among the great number of population in cities, the life in cities never let them go back to a quiet country life.

 

However, human bonding is most important for human beings because we are social creatures. Statistically, when children feel secure in their young ages at home, they can be persistent and strive for anything after they become adults. This is because the security in their mind keeps them motivated and confronts any challenging situation they might encounter.

 

Balancing between a warm family atmosphere and the community environment is critical because it supports young people’s internal development and communication skills. A family should look after each other to build up their trust, and secondly disciplines are needed to learn events that happen in the actual world.

At Respect for the Aged Day, I am thinking about it.

 

I will update every Monday.
For more information
Japanese business consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)

Akiko HORI

https://lawhelp4u.com/english/legal-advice-for-business-in-japan/

Realising women’s potential in business

My father’s family owns a business, but I grew up in a very ordinary family environment, because my father didn’t succeed in his family business and was employed by a company and my mother is a housewife. When I got married, I had no idea about taking more than a part-time job just to kill time, and I had never thought about a “business”.

 

I’m a Shihoshoshi Lawyer now, but I wish I had worked harder in that banking-related environment when I was working at a bank. However, as I always tell my child, “Failure is never a bad thing”. “The problem is what results those mistakes leave behind”, but I should think about what the reasons were for my mistakes and learn from them and apply them to my decision-making process in the future.

 

I think the percentage of women in management positions in Japan is still low, compared to other countries. There is no need to feel sad about the low rate because it reflects the past, and there are no 100% perfect methods in life. We should focus on the factors to consider when thinking about what to do in the future.

I decided I could turn the energy and positivity I was experiencing into my own business. I am working tirelessly to support everyone wanting to unleash their full potential with the “Ideas-turned-business” perspective, and how the Japanese legal system is used for those purposes.

 

I will update every Monday.
For more information

http://lawhelp4u.com/advice/
Japanese business consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

Wise advice: Those that fail to learn from the mistakes of history are bound to repeat them.

Japanese business start-up consultant

The legal system takes together processes and procedures, and each country constitutes its own category. The system was backed up by history, thus, history has interested me as a way of finding out about other countries.

 

There are very great differences between the Common Law and Civil Law systems in many areas of the law, and the Japanese system generally follows the Civil Law system. The traditional Japanese system was similar like in the old Roman system, where the head of the family had control over his sons and younger brothers, even if adults, and the family women including a widowed mother, wife and unmarried sisters and daughters with the head of the house having authority over all other members of the house, until he was succeeded by his eldest son in his death.

 

After the late 18th century, the French Revolution, which brought about the ideas that all adult family members were equal, so that the head of the family had no legal control over his adult sons and daughters, and that all had, at least in principle, equal rights of succession, was truly revolutionary in changing the law in this area. It also affected the Japanese system.

 

I will update every Monday.
For more information

https://lawhelp4u.com/propertyJapan/

Japanese business consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

Work life balance and Japanese bank holidays

Today(10th August, 2020) is a bank holiday, called Mountain Day in Japan. It is a public holiday stipulated by the Article 2 of the Act on National Holidays, and according to the law, there are 16 days of public holidays a year in Japan. https://elaws.e-gov.go.jp/search/elawsSearch/elaws_search/lsg0500/detail?lawId=323AC1000000178

The number of public holidays in the UK, where I lived in the past, is 8 days a year. https://www.gov.uk/bank-holidays

I often feel that there are too many bank holidays in Japan, and when I find that Japan has twice as many bank holidays as the UK, I think to myself my feeling is right.

I have made a comparison of the number of bank holidays in the UK and Japan, so let’s take a look at some of the cultural differences related to holidays. As a reader of this blog, you may relate to Japanese society, and you may also hear that the Japanese people don’t take a day off work unless it’s a bank holiday.

In my experience, colleagues go to work even though they have a fever or a bad cold. Ever since I started to be self-employed, I’ve been thinking that they don’t need to push themselves too hard about going to work, but many of them I know go to work anyway. Then, if their condition gets worse, they would go home. However, it is likely for them to stay in their office until 5 or 6 pm. The background to this attitude, on the positive side, is that it is an expression of a sense of responsibility that they shouldn’t inconvenience other colleagues, but on the negative side, the old practice of “traditional loyalty” still exists in Japanese society.

I hope that the attitude above will be changed soon because of the recent Covid-19 pandemic.

On the other hand, when I talk to friends from Britain about this matter, their typical attitude is that “No way!”. Then, they ask next how many days of holiday Japanese workers have. The answer is about a week. When I answer like that, they definitely say that that is not a holiday at all. At least a month of annual holiday is needed. I’m sure that Japanese culture has certain strengths, but I personally hope, as my British friends say, that the standard holiday entitlement should be at least a month.

In addition, in Japan, there is a custom, called “OBON” (お盆), to welcome the spirits of ancestors from the afterlife to return for a few days in the middle of August. It will be from 13th to 16th August in 2020. This custom is regarded as a Buddhist one, but a memorial service has been held once or twice a year to honor the spirits of ancestors since ancient times of Japan. “OBON” is an event that integrates ancient Japanese customs and Buddhism ones.

Note to self, “OBON” is not a bank holiday, so council offices and banks are open for business as usual.

I will update every Monday.
For more information
Japanese business start-up consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

https://lawhelp4u.com/advice/

Please keep “Information for registration identification” (登記識別情報) safe.

Japanese business start-up consultant

Occasionally, people who cannot find their “Information for registration identification” are asking how they restore the document.

Information for registration identification is an important document that proves you have the ownership of the real property.
Unfortunately, it is not reissued at the Legal Affairs Bureau.

If there is a risk of theft, there is a procedure of invalidating the PIN code to let the Legal Affairs Bureau know.
However, even after invalidating the PIN code, Information for registration identification is not reissued. That is the system of Japan.

If the document are not found, strict identity verification is required when selling the real property, and the lawyer in charge of the sale will handle it to prove your identity, which normally incur an additional cost. The amount of the cost depends on the lawyer.

One of the best ways to store documents is at home in a safe or file box. If you don’t know which one is an important document, asking in person is the best thing to do.

I hope the information is useful.
I will update every Monday.
For more information
Japanese business start-up consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

https://lawhelp4u.com/propertyJapan/

Real property in Japan and Highly-Skilled Foreign Professionals

Regarding restrictions on foreign ownership of real property vary from country to country, but Japan is a country which falls into the unregulated category.

Up to now, with respect to the purchase of real property in Japan, the number of people who purchase real property in Japan has steadily increased because of the Tokyo Olympics and the weaker yen.
Popular options are to own apartments or commercial buildings in central Tokyo,  and resort properties in Niseko, Hokkaido.

In Japan, there are no restrictions on non-Japanese purchasing real property regardless of their immigration status, such as permanent residence, nationality, or visa type. The taxation for non-Japanese has no difference from the one for Japanese.

There is no time limit on owning real property, an owner can be freely bought and sold, and can be inherited. However, importantly the inheritance tax or estate tax should be considered.

In principle, there is no visa, such as Tier 1 investor visa (UK) or EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program (US). However, if you have a rental property in Japan with stable income, there is a possibility to be granted permanent residency under the “Highly-Skilled Foreign Professionals” system.

The problem would be a language barrier, but please feel free to contact me in English when buying or selling real property in Japan.

“Highly-Skilled Foreign Professionals”
(高度人材ポイント制)

JPN

http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/newimmiact_3/

ENG

http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/newimmiact_3/en/index.html

I hope the information is useful.
I will update every Monday.
For more information
Japanese business start-up consultant
Shihoshoshi Lawyer
(Judicial Scrivener)
Akiko HORI

https://lawhelp4u.com/propertyJapan/